Healthy Eating Over the Holidays

by: cancercompass

The holidays have arrived! Sunday marked the last night of Hanukkah, and Christmas is right around the corner. Then, just a couple of weeks away it will be time to celebrate the New Year. One thing is for certain, winter holidays often revolve around friends, family and food.

If you’re currently going through cancer treatment, eating might not be the first thing on your mind. However, staying nourished during treatment is extremely important to your overall health, as the right foods food can give you the strength necessary to fight your cancer.

During this time, your body is going to need more fuel than normal, in order to repair rapidly from the effects of treatments such as surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Therefore, you’ll want to give your body a constant supply of nutrients, including calories, protein, carbohydrates, fat, vitamins and minerals.

Here are some tips about what to include – and what to avoid – in your diet over the holidays to help you stay strong and healthy.

Carbohydrates (carbs) provide fuel for your body and brain. Carbohydrates are found in dozens of holiday foods from mashed potatoes to apple pie. Load up more on complex carbs and limit the simple kind.

Simple carbs include processed flour and sugar products, like you’ll find in pies, holiday cookies and cakes.

Complex carbs can be found in whole grains, whole fruits, beans and vegetables. Add a fresh fruit salad for desert and a salad course to fit these complex carbs into your holiday plans. Also, serve brown rice instead of white rice, as it contains cancer-fighting properties and dietary fiber.

Fats are another vital part of your diet. There is a common misconception that all fats are bad, but unsaturated fats are actually good for you. Focus on limiting or avoiding saturated fats and trans fatty acids, but feel free to enjoy goodies that have unsaturated fats.

Saturated Fats – These can be found in animal products – such as beef and poultry with the skin – which might be the centerpiece of your festive meal. No need to cut out meat altogether, just serve lean cuts of beef, skinless poultry and reduced fat or fat-free dairy products.

Trans Fatty Acids – These are found in products that have been hydrogenated, such as shortening, some margarines and butter, baked goods and snack items. Your desert table is going to have a number of trans fatty culprits. Adding the aforementioned fruit salad option is one solution, and you can also try out some low-fat baking recipes.

Unsaturated Fats – This is what we call the “good fat.” Cook with olive oil and canola oil whenever possible, and also fill a bowl with almonds and nuts for a pre-meal snack. Adding an avocado to the salad can also add more good fats to your meal. Be careful not to go overboard, and make sure that you are still adhering to your recommended daily dose of fat and calories.

Protein is essential to your health, and is responsible for building your immune system, muscles, hormones and enzymes, and can also repair tissue. Work with a dietitian to estimate how much protein your body will need on a daily basis, especially if you are currently going through cancer treatment. Nuts, eggs, meat, fish, beans and legumes are all great sources of protein. Be sure to include some of these items in your holiday meal!

Happy holidays!