PSA rising after surgery, androgen and radiation therapy

3 Posts | Page(s): 1 

PSA rising after surgery, androgen and radiation therapy

by Moonchelle on Fri Jun 16, 2017 06:02 PM

Quote | Reply

My spouse has been cancer free for over 7 years. He had a prosectomoy and underwent androgen therapy for a year and also radiation therapy. His PSA has been zero and his GP checks it every six months. His last PSA was .06 is this indicative of a reccurrence and what, if anything, would be recommended. Perhaps I'm just worried over nothing but it seems odd that it would rise from 0 to .06  Also is white count is a tad high at 18 but he usually has a count of 14. Thank you for your time and consideration concerning this matter. 

RE: PSA rising after surgery, androgen and radiation therapy

by eat2bwell on Mon Jun 19, 2017 04:16 PM

Quote | Reply

On Jun 16, 2017 6:02 PM Moonchelle wrote:

My spouse has been cancer free for over 7 years. He had a prosectomoy and underwent androgen therapy for a year and also radiation therapy. His PSA has been zero and his GP checks it every six months. His last PSA was .06 is this indicative of a reccurrence and what, if anything, would be recommended. Perhaps I'm just worried over nothing but it seems odd that it would rise from 0 to .06  Also is white count is a tad high at 18 but he usually has a count of 14. Thank you for your time and consideration concerning this matter. 

Studies have shown that low levels of vitamin D show a rise in PSA levels.  Have your spouse get  his vitamin D level check and adjust it to an appropriate level.  Diet is also a key so get on an appropiate diet to address prostate problem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KzZafNhKso

RE: PSA rising after surgery, androgen and radiation therapy

by tomatoman on Mon Jun 19, 2017 08:55 PM

Quote | Reply

A small rise in PSA like that means that the surgery and treatments did not remove all of the prostate cells, which is normal.  Even prostatectomy does not necessarily remove all prostate cells.  Only a significant rise to over 4 would be interpreted as a sign of remaining prostate cancer cells.

I had radiation therapy in 2008, and my PSA rose afterwards to the range of .3 to .6 for a few years.  After over three years, my PSA then rose to  above 4, indicating metastasis.  Here I am five years after metastasis diagnosis, and three hormone therapy series, with PSA in the .3 to .5 range.

I personally think that worry is one of the worst symptoms of the disease, so if you can take PSA more frequently, it can help to reassure you and him.  Only if it gets higher than 4 should you believe the cancer is recurring. So, just keep your eye on it.  It could rise slightly for years without meaning cancer.  That's my opinion.

3 Posts | Page(s): 1 
Subscribe to this message board discussion

Latest Messages

View More

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.