NOTICE: As of June 15, this community will have a new web address: compass.cancerfighter.com. You will no longer be able to access the site at CancerCompass.com For more information, please read the full blog post.

 

16 Days Post op rc

60 Posts | Page(s): 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next 

16 Days Post op rc

by Penguin on Thu Nov 17, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
I had my RC done on 11/1/05, surgery was three hours. In the hospital for six days. Feeling good now up and about 80% of the day. Still need to take long naps. Waiting for my catherer to be removed on 11/28/05. If anyone has any questions about a RC feel free to email me. Tim

What Does rc Stand For?

by Steph2005 on Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Sorry, this is all kind of new to me. What does RC stand for? My husband has bladder cancer & will be having his bladder removed in January. He has one more chemo treatment next Monday then we go for the surgery consult on Dec. 13. I am interested in knowing how recovery is from bladder removal. He hopes to get a neobladder. Thanks in advance, Stephanie

rc

by Penguin on Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Hi Stephanie, A RC is a radical cystectomy is the removal of the bladder, lymph nodes and possibly the prostate or parts of the prostate. I did get a neobladder. It's been 3 weeks, I'm waiting to get my catherer out on the 28th and will enter the second stage of recovery. That is learning how to use my new bladder. I can't tell you how very important it is to have a surgeon that does hundreds of these operations a year. If your surgeon does less than 50 of these year I would highly recommend you find a surgeon with more experience. My fast recovery is completely contributed to the experience of Dr. Joseph Smith, Chairman of Urology at Vanderbilt Medical Center, in Nashville, TN. He was a pioneer in this operation. My surgery only took 3 hours and I was in the hospital for 6 days and feeling relatively normal in 12 days. Getting up and moving and walking the day after the surgery is very important even though your husband won't want to do it. Waking up the bowels is the key to getting out of the hospital and feeling normal. This is a very tough surgery, I'm 48 and was in ok physical shape prior. I don't know how old your husband is or what kind of physical condition he is in. I had bladder cancer for 12 years, the last 8 I was cancer free until this nasty tumor showed up. So it was time for it to go. Any other questions please ask as I'm more than willing to help any way I can. If his operation isn't until January he may want to start walking before the surgery. Remember walking is the key. Tim

rc

by Steph2005 on Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Thanks for the fast response. My husband is 28 years old. Hopefully he will have a fast recovery like you. We live in Louisville, KY but the doctors here do not have much experience with the neobladder. We are traveling to Indiana University Medical Center for the surgery to be conducted by Dr. Koch, the cheif of Urology. He told us he has been doing this surgery for 15 years...the doctors in Louisville were not even familiar with it! My husbands tumor was 8 cm and had already moved into the muscle wall. He is just finishing his 4th round of chemotherapy. Dr. Koch thinks my husband will be a good candidate for the neobladder but stated it is "an operating room decision." They will also be removing his prostate as a precaution. Dr. Koch is going to preform a "nerve sparing" operation in hopes that my husband will still have sexual function with some help of drugs (Viagria maybe?) but we assume that will also be something that is determined once they open him up. After the second round of chemo was completed, my husband had a CT scan and was told that the tumor was shrinking. He will have another CT scan on Dec. 8 to see the latest results. My husband is in good physical shape, aside from the cancer. The chemo is taking a toll on him; he is tired constantly. The doctors want him to have December free of chemo or any other treatment to allow him to regain his strength & white blood cells before surgery. I am glad to hear that you are having a positive experience. My husband and I feel that the neobladder will allow him to have the most normal quality of life, post op. Of course, if he must have an external bag, we would accept that as well. Saving his life is the most important factor. We have an 8 month old little boy that needs his Dad! Thanks again for sharing your story. I hope your recovery continues to go well. Also, we were going to go to either Vandy Medical Center or IU medical Center for a second opinion. We ended up at IU only because we were able to get an appointment there faster than at Vandy. Thanks again, Steph

rc

by Penguin on Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Steph, With your husband being so young he should be able go through this with good results. I have heard good things about Dr. Koch. With me also it was an operating room decision on the neo bladder, I was able to get the neo bladder and have the nerve sparing (worked) not a good thing with the catherer in. Big relief to know everything still works. He will look a bit like Frankenstein when he comes out of surgery, he will iv's and a couple of drainage tubes so don't let that alarm you. He will also have a morphine pump for the pain. It is a button he can push when he needs it. The faster he can get rid of the pump the better but tell him not to go through any unneccesary pain. I was able to get rid of my pump in about 3 days. The bowels won't wake up as long as there is morphine in your system. At this stage 20 days post op Tyleno is all I need to manage the pain. The first few days are the worst after that it gets better. Tell him to do every single thing the doctors and nurses ask him to do and to push it just a little. I found walking the first few times was very painful and tiring but after the walk I would lie down, sleep for a while and when I woke up I felt better. Not a lot better but better and got better with every walk. My heart goes out to him for what he is about to go through but remember you don't need an organ in you that is full of cancer. Even after 8 years it can still come back but not now. I am for the first time in 12 years cancer free. Tim

More Info Needed

by Steph2005 on Tue Nov 22, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Hi Tim, I have a couple more questions if you don't mind. I know you said you were having your catheter removed soon. If this is too personal and you don't wish to share, I understand. Do you have a catheter that is inserted through the penis? The reason I am asking is because when we originally spoke to Dr Koch, he explained several options that we may be able to persue, depending on how much the tumor shrinks. One would be to rebuild the bladder with tissue from the intestenal wall(neo bladder I assume??)and urine would be excreted through the penis. The next best option was what they referred to as an Indiana pouch. That is just like the external bag, but it is on the inside. Urine would need to be excreted using a small straw-like tube about every 3 or 4 hours. The final option is the external bag. I know Dr Koch will answer all of our questions when we go back to Indy in December, but if you could share your experience with me (or correct me if I am wrong) I would appreciate it. Thanks for your help. Stephanie

More Inf Needed

by Penguin on Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Hi Steph, I do have a catherer with my neo bladder which was made from my intestine. The catherer stays in for 2-3 weeks after surgery (it is through my penis) so that the new bladder will heal. After it is removed I will urinate just like I use to. I will have to work on controlling it and they say that can take some time. My doctor also told me prior to surgery that there were three options, the first the neo bladder, second a pouch and third an external bag. It is really look and see when they start the surgery to see what will really work the best. Any other questions feel free to ask. Tim

More Info

by Penguin on Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Hi Steph, The neo Bladder as you know is made out of 24 inches of your small intestine. the problem with using the intestine as a bladder is that the intestine produces a "mucus" and it can clog you up if you don't drink enough fluids they leave the catherer in for 3-4 weeks for two reasons one to allow time to heal and also to allow you to irrigate the mucus that the neo bladder will produce. Three or four times a day, sometimes more you will fill a large syrgine like device with sodium chloride irrigation solution to flush the catherer. You put the solution in and draw it back out until the solution is clear (no mucus in the syrgine). After about a year the neo bladder will stop producing this mucus. It looks just like egg drop soup, something we will never eat again. Tim

Thanks

by Steph2005 on Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Hi Tim, Thanks for the info. Thankfully, I do not like egg drop soup! Have a great Thanksgiving. Stephanie

Thanks

by Penguin on Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Steph, You are welcome. Have a nice Thanksgiving also. Tim and Kathy
60 Posts | Page(s): 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next 
Subscribe to this message board discussion

Latest Messages

View More

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.