Amphibian and Glioblastomas

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Amphibian and Glioblastomas

by Wtng4amiracle on Tue Nov 22, 2005 12:00 AM

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First, I need to tell everyone, that my 23 year old brother, has brain cancer. The tumor is a "glioblastoma". He has gone through 4 chemos, that didn't work. Including chemo for COLON cancer, which blew a couple of holes in his rear. Upon speaking to his pharmacist, she told me of this "poisonous toad, or amphibian" that they found attacks the "bad" cells and is proven highly effective in glioblastomas. I am VERY desperate to find help for my brother. Has anyone heard of this study? If so, please tell me more about it. Thanks! Katina

Frogs

by Oncrx on Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:00 AM

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poison from certain frogs has been tested in some cancers. I am not sure if there is one specific for GBM or not. I would check into clinical trials for GBM with your doctor or check yourself online.

Scorpion

by Debmac on Mon Nov 28, 2005 12:00 AM

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Are you talking about the Israeli Yellow Scorpion? Look that up on the Internet. Someone told my husband about that. I am very skeptical about that kind of thing, but what do I know!

Gbm Help

by Gagbm on Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:00 AM

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Miracle, this disease sucks but there are people do survive long-term. There is no reason your brother cannot be one of them. I recommend you join the brain-tumor email list from the Musella foundation on virtualtrials.com - it is a great source of information. Also, you didn't mention if your brother's tumor could be surgically removed or who you had taken him to see for second opinions. Also, has he had radiation? There are a number of brain tumor centers in the country that specialize in treating these things. While there is no data to suggest that patients treated at a center fare better than those who aren't, virtually all of the long-term GBM survivors we have met are treated there. Look into University of California San Francisco, MD Anderson in Houston, and Duke University's Brain Tumor Center. My 31 year-old wife has GBM diagnosed 6/1/05. She has had surgery, IL-13 clinical trial, radiation, Temodar, and fits the genetic profile for Tarceva so we will be adding that to the mix as well. MRI yesterday was clear - no active cancer. Best of luck.

Gagbm Reply

by Wtng4amiracle on Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:00 AM

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Joshua (my brother) has not had a second opinion as far as I know. This is his second bout with brain cancer. The first time it was a level two, and they were able to remove it and do radiation, which put him into remission for five years. This time it is in a very bad part of his brain and is actually across both sides. (forgive me I am not very wise when it comes to terminology)and the surgeon, Dr. Doedoe I like to call him (whom I dislike very very much due to lack of treatment and concern on Joshuas behalf) came out of the operating room no more than 30 minutes into the procedure and told my mom that it was inoperable and that he would be a vegetable if they removed it. My feeling, he gave up on my brother that day. I wont give up on him. I could try to convince my mom to get a second opinion on whether or not they can operate, with a different doctor of course. But I am not sure if they can do radiation again. Thank you for responding to my message, Any information, or inspiration is always welcome! Congratulations on your wifes recovery!!!!!!!!

Don't Give up Just Yet...

by Gagbm on Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:00 AM

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Neurosurgeons are a lot like NFL quarterbacks - some are MUCH better than others. My wife has had 3 surgeries - 2 craniotomies and 1 catheter implantation for a clinical trial. The first surgeon to operate in Atlanta was a gloomy gus -only removed 50% of the tumor and gave her about a year to live. Our surgeon at Duke got 100% and vowed to "try to cure her until proven otherwise". She is back at work, exercising regularly, and raising our son. Bottom line, get a second opinion from someone who treats a a lot of brain tumors. You don't necessarily have to physically send your brother to the center - most of the time you can send the MRI scans and pathology slides. It might turn out there is not much else they can offer, but you will know that you exhausted the limits of modern medical technology. Radiation to the brain is typically a one-time shot, depending on the type and dose of radiation done. There are a lot of chemotherapy options as well. Just remember, what is impossible for one surgeon to remove might be possible for another more skilled/experienced one. Doctors are smart people but they are not all-knowing or all-powerful - we have caught too many mistakes or oversights to put 100% faith in any one. We take a team approach to my wife's care - putting a bunch of heads together and making them agree on the best course of treatment. As a sidebar, we know people with GBM's who have non-resectable tumors who are 2 years out and still fully functional, working, and enjoying their lives due to the chemo and radiation they were on. Best of luck and don't EVER accept one doctor's opinion as the final say on your brother's life.

Here is Some Info on This.

by Lookingforanswers on Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:00 AM

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I saw this post and did a little research on this. Here is what I found: "Bombesin is a tetradecapeptide originally obtained from the orange and yellow skin of two toad species, Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata. Human bombesin receptor subtype 3 (BRS-3) is an orphan receptor, found predominantly in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. The role of BRS-3 in physiological or pathological processes is obscure due to the lack of selective ligands or identification of its endogenous ligand. Bombesin-like peptides are involved in the growth regulation of various cancers. Expression of BRS-3 in human tumours was found preferentially in the neuroendocrine tumours of the lung (bronchial carcinoids, small-cell lung cancer cell lines and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma), indicating that BRS-3 could serve as a therapeutic target for human lung carcinoma." If you have a google search on "bombesin" and "glioblastoma" there is quite a bit of very technical research on this. I quess the next step would be to start calling cancer centers and try to find a clinical trial. It does sound promising. Good Luck.
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