Surviving Grade 3 Anaplastic Astrocytoma

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RE: Surviving Grade 3 Anaplastic Astrocytoma

by HONEYCOMB1968 on Sun Jan 08, 2017 10:53 PM

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well i'm glad your feeling great they told me when diagnosed 5 years its been 15 now so keep fighting

RE: Surviving Grade 3 Anaplastic Astrocytoma

by Otherwise2017 on Tue Feb 21, 2017 11:21 PM

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Hi, My husband was diagnosed after a seizure in 2009, our 1st was 9 months old. We did a watch and wait for 3 years, in that time we had a baby girl.

In 2011 his tumour grew to 3 times its orignial size in 6 months. He had a partial resection , Chemo and radiation in 2012.

we have always been hopeful beyond all sense, we prayed we did a little bit of everything, the road is long, but luckily we are still on it.

We had our 3rd, perfect baby girl in 2015 after all that chemo (can you believe it !!) she is perfect, and he is doing GREAT !!!!! a little tired, a little bit shy of the man he once was but he is going strong. We have learned to live with this thing, its not fair, its not normal, but we are doing good, each MRI follow up is scary but it becomes part of life, Ive learned that I am stronger than I ever thought I could be. Each day as daylight comes through the curtains is a gift.

I hope the sun is still shining on you x

RE: Surviving Grade 3 Anaplastic Astrocytoma

by Tampa73 on Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:02 PM

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On May 04, 2006 12:00 AM Beach1 wrote:

I am trying to find hope for my husband who was diagnosed on February 18th with a grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma. We have 4 small kids that love their Dad! He was very down today, because we have not heard of anyone who has survived longer than two years with this type of tumor. I am making it my quest to find someone, preferably multiple people! Please let me know if you know of anyone, and at what time they are at. Thanks for your help

I hope your husband is a survivor just like me. I was  also diagnosed with a Grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma in Oct 2005. I continue to be cancer free today, March 20th, 2017!  I did not want to know my prognosis...I just knew I wanted it out of me and I was determined to beat it with my strong faith, family, friends and  lots of laughter.

RE: Surviving Grade 3 Anaplastic Astrocytoma

by sanna333 on Tue Mar 21, 2017 08:57 PM

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On Mar 20, 2017 11:02 PM Tampa73 wrote:

On May 04, 2006 12:00 AM Beach1 wrote:

I am trying to find hope for my husband who was diagnosed on February 18th with a grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma. We have 4 small kids that love their Dad! He was very down today, because we have not heard of anyone who has survived longer than two years with this type of tumor. I am making it my quest to find someone, preferably multiple people! Please let me know if you know of anyone, and at what time they are at. Thanks for your help

I hope your husband is a survivor just like me. I was  also diagnosed with a Grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma in Oct 2005. I continue to be cancer free today, March 20th, 2017!  I did not want to know my prognosis...I just knew I wanted it out of me and I was determined to beat it with my strong faith, family, friends and  lots of laughter.

I was wondering that did you get a gross total resection or partial resection?

RE: Surviving Grade 3 Anaplastic Astrocytoma

by Otherwise2017 on Tue Mar 21, 2017 10:32 PM

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Hi, He had a partial re-section. We were informed after surgery that they got 70% of the tumour. He had radio therapy and chemotherapy after .

RE: Surviving Grade 3 Anaplastic Astrocytoma

by DianneMF on Wed Mar 22, 2017 12:08 AM

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I have been told that it doesn't matter if a neurosurgeon tells you it is complete or partial. This cancer is like flower seeds thrown in grass. It can spring back up whenever it wants. I live this Ca every day with my 26 yr old daughter who by the way has not had a change in her MRI in 3 years. The days leading up to the next MRI are excruciating. Her tumor still remains- most was excised- but the rest is inoperable. Her quality of life? Amazing. She works, travels, dates, lives her life to the fullest extent possible. We too do not look or think about prognosis. What is the point honestly?? It has taken a lot of soul searching & therapy to get to this point. But each day seeing her, getting a text, crazy email or phone call is a blessing. She sees a therapist who specializes in PTSD - bc that is what is has come down to. You can't change what has happened to you, but you can & you will move past this. I pray that my amazing daughter will continue to thrive, grow & just live. I pray this nightly for her & everyone on this site in BT world. It's a very lonely place ; one that most people never experience & those who do know what I mean.

RE: Still Here

by Macarnhm on Thu Mar 30, 2017 01:07 AM

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Hi Sarah, I wanted to know how are you doing ?! I was diagnosed last year with the same I wanted to know how was it ? I'm still in treatment but I want to know about what comes after

RE: Still Here

by kindnessmatters on Tue May 16, 2017 02:00 PM

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Hello all you fighters and loved ones out there.  Thought it was about time I told you about my daughter.  On June 1, 2009, at the age of 38 she was diagnosed with an anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III primary) in the left temporal lobe.  Of course, we were all devastated and assumed the worst (we are a medical family and know too much, I suppose).  Her prognosis at that time was 3-5 years. 

Because it was in an eloquent part of the brain (the language center), surgery was not an option - well, that is, other than the biopsy she had to determine the type of tumor.  She had the standard 6 weeks of targeted radiation and 18 months of temodar.

She is a language teacher (which made her tumor all the more interesting to the neuro-oncologist) and she continued to teach for 4 years.  Her language and memory deficits proved to be too much, so she finally went on disability.

She is alive 8 years after the initial diagnosis, and functions quite well!!  

She has fatigue (the doctor said that is something that never really goes away and it is the kind of fatique in which sleep does not refresh).  She has short term memory issues and some language deficits, much like an elderly person would have like recalling words, etc.  

She continues to take Kepra.   She also takes adderall for the fatigue.

We are also aware of some personality changes, nothing serious, just changes.  For example, she exhibts inappropriate jocularity and at times can appear indifferent (which is far from the way she was before).  But all in all, these things are minor (other than requiring lots of patience for family members)

She has an extensive MRI every 6 months and so far, so good!

RE: Still Here

by gillycat on Tue May 16, 2017 02:45 PM

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Wow thank you for sharing your daughters story!!!!!!! It gives us so much hope!!!!!

RE: Still Here

by Superman1 on Wed May 17, 2017 02:30 PM

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On May 16, 2017 2:00 PM kindnessmatters wrote:

Hello all you fighters and loved ones out there.  Thought it was about time I told you about my daughter.  On June 1, 2009, at the age of 38 she was diagnosed with an anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III primary) in the left temporal lobe.  Of course, we were all devastated and assumed the worst (we are a medical family and know too much, I suppose).  Her prognosis at that time was 3-5 years. 

Because it was in an eloquent part of the brain (the language center), surgery was not an option - well, that is, other than the biopsy she had to determine the type of tumor.  She had the standard 6 weeks of targeted radiation and 18 months of temodar.

She is a language teacher (which made her tumor all the more interesting to the neuro-oncologist) and she continued to teach for 4 years.  Her language and memory deficits proved to be too much, so she finally went on disability.

She is alive 8 years after the initial diagnosis, and functions quite well!!  

She has fatigue (the doctor said that is something that never really goes away and it is the kind of fatique in which sleep does not refresh).  She has short term memory issues and some language deficits, much like an elderly person would have like recalling words, etc.  

She continues to take Kepra.   She also takes adderall for the fatigue.

We are also aware of some personality changes, nothing serious, just changes.  For example, she exhibts inappropriate jocularity and at times can appear indifferent (which is far from the way she was before).  But all in all, these things are minor (other than requiring lots of patience for family members)

She has an extensive MRI every 6 months and so far, so good!

Thank u so much for sharing positive news! My husband is a 4 year survivor of AA Grade III with no recurrence. He has the same issues you described but is doing so well. He also takes Keppra and has fatigue that seems to be slowly getting better. He just had to take naps some days. Some people beat the odds. My husband is mentally strong and has believed from day one that he will beat this and live a long life. I thank God every day! Blessings to you and your daughter!
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