Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

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Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by dalt1 on Tue May 31, 2011 12:56 AM

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I posted a while back how I turned around my myelofibrosis within a very short period using vitamin c and selenium and I have been asymptomatic for approx 1.5 years now.

Those MF sufferers will find hope with the following extract that medical research in 2002 (yes, nine years ago) it was discovered that vitamin c will supress the Jak 2 inhibitor gene that is suspected of triggering myelofibrosis.

I might add that major cancer institutes are rushing to find a supressor for the JAK 2 gene in the hope of making a lot of money. Why, when it is readily available now.

Read the extract and for those who want the full medical article to give to your oncologists, let me know and I will forward this to you. Don't be surprised that the oncologists will Pooh Pooh the research as there is no money in vitamin c injections, but there is in administering chemo drugs and bone marrow transplants -

"HEMATOPOIESIS
Vitamin C inhibits granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor–induced signaling pathways
Juan M. Ca´rcamo, Oriana Bo´rquez-Ojeda, and David W. Golde
Vitamin C is present in the cytosol as ascorbic acid, functioning primarily as a cofactor for enzymatic reactions and as an antioxidant to scavenge free radicals.
Human granulocyte macrophage–colonystimulating
factor (GM-CSF) induces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uses ROS for some signaling functions.
We therefore investigated the effect of vitamin C on GM-CSF–mediated responses.
Loading U937 cells with vitamin C decreased intracellular levels of ROS and inhibited the production of ROS induced
by GM-CSF. Vitamin C suppressed GM-CSF–dependent phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of
transcription 5 (Stat-5) and mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase (Erk1 and Erk2) in a dose-dependent manner as was
phosphorylation of MAP kinase induced by both interleukin 3 (IL-3) and GM-CSF in HL-60 cells. In 293T cells transfected with alpha and beta GM-CSF receptor subunits
(GMR and GMR), GM-CSF–induced phosphorylation of GMR and Jak-2 activation was suppressed by vitamin
C loading. GM-CSF–mediated transcriptional activation of a luciferase reporter construct containing STAT-binding sites was also inhibited by vitamin C.
These results substantiate the importance of ROS in GM-CSF signaling and indicate a role for vitamin C in downmodulating GM-CSF signaling responses. Our findings point to vitamin C as a regulator of cytokine redox-signal transduction in host defense cells and a possible role in controlling inflammatory responses.
(Blood. 2002;99:3205-3212)
© 2002 by The American Society of Hematology

I can be contacted through the contact section of www.ecobites.com - reference Dalt - Jak 2/Vitamin C medical paper

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by Yaziza on Sat Jul 02, 2011 03:52 AM

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If profit weren't a factor in what gets reseached for a cure we would have more to work with.

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by Crosas on Fri Dec 11, 2015 04:27 PM

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I tried to contact you throught the ecobites website and it would not allow me to do so.  Can you please send me the amounts of vitamin c.  Also what does the selineium do for JAK2?

Thank you so much for your time and attention.  I will keep you in my prayers

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by EMarieC on Sun Jan 10, 2016 06:48 PM

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On May 31, 2011 12:56 AM dalt1 wrote:

I posted a while back how I turned around my myelofibrosis within a very short period using vitamin c and selenium and I have been asymptomatic for approx 1.5 years now.

Those MF sufferers will find hope with the following extract that medical research in 2002 (yes, nine years ago) it was discovered that vitamin c will supress the Jak 2 inhibitor gene that is suspected of triggering myelofibrosis.

I might add that major cancer institutes are rushing to find a supressor for the JAK 2 gene in the hope of making a lot of money. Why, when it is readily available now.

Read the extract and for those who want the full medical article to give to your oncologists, let me know and I will forward this to you. Don't be surprised that the oncologists will Pooh Pooh the research as there is no money in vitamin c injections, but there is in administering chemo drugs and bone marrow transplants -

"HEMATOPOIESIS
Vitamin C inhibits granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor–induced signaling pathways
Juan M. Ca´rcamo, Oriana Bo´rquez-Ojeda, and David W. Golde
Vitamin C is present in the cytosol as ascorbic acid, functioning primarily as a cofactor for enzymatic reactions and as an antioxidant to scavenge free radicals.
Human granulocyte macrophage–colonystimulating
factor (GM-CSF) induces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uses ROS for some signaling functions.
We therefore investigated the effect of vitamin C on GM-CSF–mediated responses.
Loading U937 cells with vitamin C decreased intracellular levels of ROS and inhibited the production of ROS induced
by GM-CSF. Vitamin C suppressed GM-CSF–dependent phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of
transcription 5 (Stat-5) and mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase (Erk1 and Erk2) in a dose-dependent manner as was
phosphorylation of MAP kinase induced by both interleukin 3 (IL-3) and GM-CSF in HL-60 cells. In 293T cells transfected with alpha and beta GM-CSF receptor subunits
(GMR and GMR), GM-CSF–induced phosphorylation of GMR and Jak-2 activation was suppressed by vitamin
C loading. GM-CSF–mediated transcriptional activation of a luciferase reporter construct containing STAT-binding sites was also inhibited by vitamin C.
These results substantiate the importance of ROS in GM-CSF signaling and indicate a role for vitamin C in downmodulating GM-CSF signaling responses. Our findings point to vitamin C as a regulator of cytokine redox-signal transduction in host defense cells and a possible role in controlling inflammatory responses.
(Blood. 2002;99:3205-3212)
© 2002 by The American Society of Hematology

I can be contacted through the contact section of www.ecobites.com "" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.ecobites.com " target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.ecobites.com - reference Dalt - Jak 2/Vitamin C medical paper

I have Essential Thrombocythemia with the Jak 2 mutation. I am having great difficulty with my while count & infection fighting cells. My dr. Is considering switching me from Hydrea to a new drug that is supposed to block the Jak 2 mutation. Hoping perhaps Vitamin C & selenium might help. Have started taking these but have no clue as to proper amount. Can you help? EC

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by dalt1 on Sun Jan 10, 2016 11:22 PM

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Send me your email address by private reply and I will put you onto a young accountant in the USA who put his ET into remission using the protocol. Many with ET have used the protocol successfully. I also have a medical paper that states that Vitamin C is a Jak Inhibitor gene suppressor.

Dalt 

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by EMarieC on Sat Jan 16, 2016 03:11 PM

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On Jan 10, 2016 11:22 PM dalt1 wrote:

Send me your email address by private reply and I will put you onto a young accountant in the USA who put his ET into remission using the protocol. Many with ET have used the protocol successfully. I also have a medical paper that states that Vitamin C is a Jak Inhibitor gene suppressor.

Dalt 

Dalt, have sent private e-mail two or three times with no response. Maybe I am doing something wrong. Am very eager to learn the VitaminC/selenium protocol for ET. Thanks for your help.

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by GXK0017 on Mon Mar 21, 2016 11:23 AM

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Good Morning-

I was diagnosed with ET in 2009, and my only protocol was baby aspirin-but now my platelet count is over 1 mil, and my Dr wants to me take hydrea-I asked to wait, and he agreed for a 90 day follow up.   Can you please give me the info about the protocol?   Vit C, Baking Soda, Sodium Selenite.   thank you!

Gretchen

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by rising444 on Mon Feb 12, 2018 11:09 PM

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Hi dalt1, Would you please email me your protocol? I'm trying to avoid being diagnosed with polycythemia. I'm Jak 2 positive. Your protocol sounds like an answer to my prayer. Thanks! I messaged you with my email.

rising444

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by Gundi606 on Fri Mar 23, 2018 07:37 PM

Quote | Reply

On May 31, 2011 12:56 AM dalt1 wrote:

I posted a while back how I turned around my myelofibrosis within a very short period using vitamin c and selenium and I have been asymptomatic for approx 1.5 years now.

Those MF sufferers will find hope with the following extract that medical research in 2002 (yes, nine years ago) it was discovered that vitamin c will supress the Jak 2 inhibitor gene that is suspected of triggering myelofibrosis.

I might add that major cancer institutes are rushing to find a supressor for the JAK 2 gene in the hope of making a lot of money. Why, when it is readily available now.

Read the extract and for those who want the full medical article to give to your oncologists, let me know and I will forward this to you. Don't be surprised that the oncologists will Pooh Pooh the research as there is no money in vitamin c injections, but there is in administering chemo drugs and bone marrow transplants -

"HEMATOPOIESIS
Vitamin C inhibits granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor–induced signaling pathways
Juan M. Ca´rcamo, Oriana Bo´rquez-Ojeda, and David W. Golde
Vitamin C is present in the cytosol as ascorbic acid, functioning primarily as a cofactor for enzymatic reactions and as an antioxidant to scavenge free radicals.
Human granulocyte macrophage–colonystimulating
factor (GM-CSF) induces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uses ROS for some signaling functions.
We therefore investigated the effect of vitamin C on GM-CSF–mediated responses.
Loading U937 cells with vitamin C decreased intracellular levels of ROS and inhibited the production of ROS induced
by GM-CSF. Vitamin C suppressed GM-CSF–dependent phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of
transcription 5 (Stat-5) and mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase (Erk1 and Erk2) in a dose-dependent manner as was
phosphorylation of MAP kinase induced by both interleukin 3 (IL-3) and GM-CSF in HL-60 cells. In 293T cells transfected with alpha and beta GM-CSF receptor subunits
(GMR and GMR), GM-CSF–induced phosphorylation of GMR and Jak-2 activation was suppressed by vitamin
C loading. GM-CSF–mediated transcriptional activation of a luciferase reporter construct containing STAT-binding sites was also inhibited by vitamin C.
These results substantiate the importance of ROS in GM-CSF signaling and indicate a role for vitamin C in downmodulating GM-CSF signaling responses. Our findings point to vitamin C as a regulator of cytokine redox-signal transduction in host defense cells and a possible role in controlling inflammatory responses.
(Blood. 2002;99:3205-3212)
© 2002 by The American Society of Hematology

I can be contacted through the contact section of www.ecobites.com "" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.ecobites.com " target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.ecobites.com - reference Dalt - Jak 2/Vitamin C medical paper

Please give me more details 

I have MYLOFIBROSIS .... 3 years ... taking JAKAVI ....

I do ozone  glutathione and nutritional supplements infusions ......

Need your help in guiding me to up grade my protocols

Thank you

Gundi606

RE: Vitamin C supresses JAK 2 gene

by Gundi606 on Fri Mar 23, 2018 08:04 PM

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On Dec 11, 2015 4:27 PM Crosas wrote:

I tried to contact you throught the ecobites website and it would not allow me to do so.  Can you please send me the amounts of vitamin c.  Also what does the selineium do for JAK2?

Thank you so much for your time and attention.  I will keep you in my prayers

I too have MYLOFIBROSIS and need a reply to his info

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