Has anyone seen this?

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Has anyone seen this?

by davezuro on Thu Oct 17, 2013 02:32 PM

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Has anyone seen this?  I attended a presentation by this scientist explaining what this is.  Was wondering what others think!

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid175266675800

RE: Has anyone seen this?

by Oakshield on Thu Mar 12, 2015 10:20 AM

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Amazing, i'll show it to my friends. Thank you a lot, i didn't knew that. 

RE: Has anyone seen this?

by Oakshield on Fri Mar 13, 2015 10:54 AM

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Maybe for someone it will be interesting - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA

RE: Has anyone seen this?

by Oakshield on Sat Mar 14, 2015 05:27 AM

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This insormation was new to me. thant you a lot. I i'll find somth new about it, I'll write here too. 

RE: Has anyone seen this?

by hbgmysite on Mon Apr 20, 2015 01:41 AM

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nice topic, thanks for your informations. http://mysiteview.org/d/www.cancercompass.com

RE: Has anyone seen this?

by davezuro on Thu Apr 23, 2015 01:59 PM

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Dr. Galvez ( who discovered lunasin) writes this as to why lunasin has a positive impact against cancer.

 

Dr. Alfredo Galvez
April 16 at 10:41am · 

I have been getting a lot of inquiries about this property of lunasin, so I am reposting this article with additional information.

Why and how lunasin knows which genes to turn on and which genes to turn off.

The lunasin peptide and its functional homologs in other seeds are naturally found only in the storage parynchema cells of developing seeds. Lunasin binds to specific histones (packaging material of DNA) and disrupts the proper condensation of the chromatin after DNA replication, preventing the terminally differentiated storage cells from undergoing cell division. This process, called DNA endoreduplication, causes the storage cells to enlarge and after repeated cycles, grow big enough so they can store as much of the carbohydrates, proteins and other nutrients needed by the plant embryo to germinate and grow into a seedling. This functional role of lunasin in seed development is conserved in nature. Because of their functional importance in the cell expansion phase of seed development, lunasin and its homologs are found conserved in most seed proteins.

For tens of thousands of years of human evolution, seed proteins have been the major source of protein and nourishment of men foraging for plants and cultivating crops for food. My working hypothesis is that lunasin, with its histone-binding properties*, has co-evolved with the human genome to optimize the epigenetic regulation of genes important for the fitness and survival of men. This proposed model of adaptive evolution through epigenetic control of gene regulation, provides an explanation as to why lunasin has targeted and highly coordinated effects on gene expression to improve health and to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions.

In other words, lunasin exist in nature and provide health benefits for a reason and NOT by chance. And always remember that before there were drugs, there was food.

* Histones are the most conserved proteins in nature and the histone tails in histone H3 and H4 are the same in yeast, plants, animals and humans. So if you have a biological agent that binds to specific lysine residues in histones H3 and H4 in seed storage cells, like lunasin, it will also bind to the same lysine residues in histones H3 and H4 in human cells. Histone modifications (like the acetylation of lysine residues in histone H3 and H4 modulated by lunasin binding) are involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression - the on and off switches as well as the upregulation and downregulation of genes.

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